Archbishop's Appeal

The Archbishop’s Appeal is the annual fundraising campaign that provides supplemental financial assistance to institutions, programs and ministries affiliated with the Catholic Church throughout the Archdiocese of San Antonio.

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Deaf Ministry

Deaf Ministry

Deaf Ministry provides pastoral ministry to and advocates for deaf individuals throughout the archdiocese, making accessible all aspects of the Catholic Church. This office coordinates, implements, and evaluates services and programs for deaf persons. Deaf Ministry also assists parishes in identifying needs and making plans to achieve accessibility goals.

News and Upcoming Events

For more information, contact Angela Mauer at angela.mauer@archsa.org





Masses with Sign Language Interpreters:

St. Pius X - Sunday, 8:00am

3303 Urban Crest Drive

San Antonio, Texas 78209


Our Lady of Perpetual Help -
Sunday, 10:00am

16075 N. Evans Road

Selma, Texas 78154


St. Padre Pio of Pietrelcina -
Sunday, 10:30am

3843 Bulverde Parkway

San Antonio, Texas 78259


St. Francis of Assisi -
Sunday, 11:15am

4201 DeZavala Road

San Antonio, Texas 78249


St. Leo the Great -
Sunday, 12:00pm

4401 S. Flores Street

San Antonio, Texas 78214


St. Mark the Evangelist -
Sunday, 5:00pm

1602 Thousand Oaks Drive

San Antonio, Texas 78232



FAQs

  • What is American Sign Language (ASL)? American Sign Language is a visual-gestural language having its own semantic and syntactic structure used by Deaf people in the United States and in parts of Canada.
  • Is there a written version of ASL? There is no written form of ASL given its visual-gestural nature. Deaf individuals who use ASL to communicate must use English in its written form; written English, however, is not their preferred method of communication because ASL is their primary language.
  • What is the sign for ________? Because ASL has its own grammar and syntax and does not follow that of English, there are not always sign equivalents for specific words (especially out of context).
  • Can’t all Deaf people read lips? This is a common misconception among hearing people. Remember that English (spoken or written) is not the primary language of Deaf persons who use sign language to communicate. It is also important to understand that only about 30% of spoken sounds are able to be distinguished by reading lips.
  • How can a hearing person communicate with a Deaf person? If a hearing person would like to communicate with a Deaf person and knows no sign language, he or she could use gestures, pen and paper, or an interpreter if one is present.


Helpful Links


Contact Info:
Angela Mauer
Director
(210) 734-2620 EXT 1209 

210-305-5689 VP
angela.mauer@archsa.org